What

We seek to enhance the teaching of Computer Science content using online resources with a long term goal to increase participation in high school courses by students from traditionally underrepresented groups.  The goal of the partnership is to leverage the AP Computer Science A (APCSA) course offered online by NCVPS throughout NC. In the proposed work, we plan to address one of the structural constraints (e.g., not enough teachers) faced when broadening participation through the use of automated assessment tools. Furthermore, to make computing relevant to a diverse student population, we plan to create culturally responsive teaching materials and train teachers on their use. We will accomplish these goals by creating an RPP in NC.

Who

This project seeks to create a ​Research-Practitioner Partnership (RPP) with the North Carolina Virtual Public School (NCVPS), researchers at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC), and school districts surrounding UNCC.

Why

As our world continues to become more technology driven, the need for computer scientists continues to surge. Unfortunately, technology growth and the demand for computer scientists is outpacing how fast we can overcome our structural constraints to satisfy that demand. Furthermore, the existing inequities in society are limiting participation in computing to a select few groups. High schools struggle to not only get more teachers trained to offer CS courses, but also to diversify the students taking computing courses. All forecasts indicate that this demand for CS professionals will continue to grow. Based on the US Department of Labor statistics, Computer and Information technology jobs are predicted to increase 12% from 2018 to 2028. But the diversification of the workforce is not keeping pace with the growth.

 

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 2031496. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.